Charge Your Smartphone By Walking

Simple Walking can Charge your Smartphone: We all love our smartphones, but there have been times when our smartphone batteries had ditched us. The batteries of our smartphones have been one of the most irritating things in recent times. But what if you could charge your smartphone or mp3 player while taking your morning or evening walk or may be while walking to the office. Does it not seem like a brilliant plan. The good news is that this idea can soon turn into a reality and in the not so distant future, you might be able to charge your electronic devices just by plugging it into your shoe.

In the University of Wisconsin–Madison, the Mechanical Engineers have developed an innovative energy harvesting and storage technology that has the capability of reducing our dependence on the batteries in our electronic gadgets by guaranteeing us power for our gadgets no matter where we are.

Soon, You Can Charge Your Smartphone By Walking

Charge Your Smartphone By Walking

Tom Krupenkin, a mechanical engineering professor and J. Ashley Taylor, a senior scientist in the Mechanical Engineering Department of UW–Madison, in their paper, in the journal Scientific Reports, has described an energy harvesting technology, that can capture the energy of human motion and use that to power the electronics devices like smartphones and music player.

Speaking more about its project, Tom Krupenkin said – “Human walking carries a lot of energy, Theoretical estimates show that it can produce up to ten watts per shoe, and that energy is just wasted as heat. A total of 20 watts from walking is not a small thing, especially compared to the power requirements of the majority of modern mobile devices.”

According to Krupenkin if just a fraction of that energy can be tapped it is enough to power a wide range of electronic devices like smartphones, mp3 players, tablets, flashlights, laptops and flashlights.

Increase Your Smartphone Battery Life by Walking

But the constraint in achieving this is that traditional approaches to harvest and convert energy do not work well for small displacements and greater forces of footfalls. For which Krupenkin said that they have been developing newer methods to convert mechanical motion directly into electrical energy appropriate for this type of application.

Increase Your Smartphone Battery Life by Walking

The latest energy harvesting technology of these researchers takes advantage of something called “reverse electrowetting”. In this new method, as a conductive liquid interacts with a nanofilm-coated surface, this converts the mechanical energy directly into electrical energy.

Both Krupenkin and Taylor are now looking forward to partner with someone in the industry and commercialize an energy harvester embedded in the shoes through their startup, InStep NanoPower.

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